Business Coach Smacks Down on 10 Mistakes Made at Networking Events

Boxer Merged

By you!

Made in the midst of sipping that drink. Ordering that appetizer. Searching for that business card. Making that small talk. Checking that email. Contributing to that 50/50 raffle. And looking at your watch.

Then you wonder why you don’t get more business out of these events! And what are you going to do with all of those business cards you’ve collected?

Yes, all events are different. Your approach to networking often depends on the type of meeting, type of people in attendance, and type of venue. I showed up to a networking meeting last week as the speaker to find that it was set up like a night club – bar, television screens everywhere, multi-level wooden dance floors, spot lights, mirrors, and loud music. My contact described the facility to me but I really had no idea until I saw it. It was a great event but different than most business meetings given the surroundings. Again, all events are different. But if the focus of the event is to get business people together, you want to make the most of the event from a networking standpoint. What does that mean? It means making great connections that lead to great relationships that lead to great business. All of this means that great things need to happen in the process. The good news (or great news) is that these 10 mistakes I’m going to mention are completely preventable. So here they are!

Social work. Not the type you’re thinking about. At networking events, it’s great to be a social butterfly and flutter around talking about movies, vacation spots, and children’s birthday parties. You should have fun! But remember why you’re there – more business, land a job, learn something, or problem-solving. If you’re there for social networking (as in making friends and landing dates) then it’s a different business plan and probably a different meeting altogether but my remaining points still apply!

Focusing on the sale. Repeat after me – no selling ever! Focus on the relationships and the business will be there. Maybe not right away but it takes time to develop relationships. There isn’t a business meeting, networking function, chamber mixer, meet-up, or association meeting I attend where a financial planner, travel agent, web developer, social media guru, or network marketer isn’t pitching me their business. Don’t be one of them. Be there to make connections, start relationships, learn something, and help someone. That’s why you’re there!

Not getting involved in the event itself. Put yourself to work! Introduce yourself to the event planner or coordinator and offer to help with handing out paperwork, raffles, greeting, registration, arranging furniture, whatever. Bottom line – get involved! Even if those in charge don’t need your help, they will remember that you asked. Often it’s the thought that counts! Being a mover and shaker always translates into, well, being a mover and shaker.

Being too caught up with the food and drink.  Don’t let the buffet table and bar take you away from why you’re there – unless that’s why you’re there! Grab a bite, sip a drink, and keep your focus on who you’re looking to meet, what you’re going to say, and what you want to accomplish. And accomplish it! But make it fun in the process.

Not doing your homework. Shame on you if you don’t know who you want to meet (titles, professions, industry, and even names), the type of event you will be attending (chamber, association, networking roundtable, service group), what you’re going to say (specific questions, speaking points, elevator pitch), and the outcomes you seek. Prepare index cards ahead of time with your notes and lists while doing your research. That’s what LinkedIn and Google are for!

Not asking the right questions. If you ask the right question, you get the right answer. If you don’t ask the question, the answer is always no. Good rule of thumb – ask those you meet questions that you would want to be asked. So, what type of work do you do? How did you get involved in your field? How long have you been at it? What differentiates you from the “bad guys” (competition)? What brings you to this event? Who are you looking to meet? Why? Do you have a target market? How can I help? Ask these types of questions of the people you meet and see what happens!

Failing to use a strong elevator speech. You must be very clear about what you do, what you’re looking for, and how to convey it. If you don’t, who does? Keep in mind an elevator speech should not be a “pitch” or script but a structure. Your “pitch” is simply a set of guidelines that forces you to stay focused on expressing your profession, expertise, target marketplace, and call to action – when asked!

Not being collaborative. Networking is not about you. It’s always about the people you meet and like. Focus on helping them and they may help you right back. The relationships you seek should ideally be a “we” thing rather than a “me” (as in “you”) thing. Otherwise, they’re not really relationships at all. Attitude drives language. Language drives relationships. Relationships drive business. And business drives more relationships.

Not having a follow up strategy. Follow up starts at the event, not when you leave. Plan to establish follow up when you’re still at the event. Should we exchange business cards and explore how we might help one another? When would be a good time to reconnect and brainstorm? You should always know which of the business cards you’ve collected will be part of your follow up strategy. How? Because you’ll take notes on them to insure that you do!

Not keeping the end in mind. Remember why you’re at an event, meeting, or function. I attended a huge national association meeting a couple of months back and my expectation was to meet the people on my list (met them all), get my questions answered about their industry (got my answers and then some), get introduced to others on my target list (check, check), and get an article in their national publication (landed a monthly column). Focus on the outcome and as long as your expectations are reasonable you’ll meet or exceed them.

Put a fine point on not making these mistakes at the events you attend and see what happens. You may make other mistakes but be critical of yourself and try not to make the same mistakes over and over. Some people call that learning.

Onward and upward and hopefully worth the price of the 50/50!

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Michael Goldberg has helped thousands of sales producers generate hundreds of thousands of dollars of referral based business. His firm Knock Out Networking is focused on increasing the production, recruiting, and retention levels of sales teams. As an educator, coach, (and yes, an amateur boxer!), Michael speaks at conferences, writes columns in numerous publications, and is a two-time TEDx speaker. Michael is also an award winning adjunct professor at Rutgers University and frequently volunteers as a speaker at organizations focused on career search. His book Knock-Out Networking! is available now! Contact him or register for his blog 3-Minute Rounds at